Orchid Q&A

* Air Conditioning
* Ansellia africana
* Aquarium Water
* Brassavola Care
* Black Growths
* Brassavola Care
* Calanthe Culture
* Catts in Hawaii
* Change of Environment
* Coconut Husk
* Cymbidiella rhodocheila
* Culture of Alba Orchids
* Dehydration
* Dendrobium Care
* Dendrobium Repotting
* Dendrochilum magnum
* Dormancy
* Dry Conditions
* Epsom Salts
* Eulophia species
* Fertilizer Injector Dosage
* Flowering Vanilla
* Habenaria rhodocheila
* Holcoglossum kimballiana
* Inobulbum munificum
* Jewel Orchids
* Judging Orchids
* Leaf Color
* Leaf Residue
*
Leaftip Burn
* Liparis viridiflora



Q.

Phalaenopsis Spiking
When should my phalaenopsis start putting up spikes? I thought it would be around this time (January), but they are doing nothing. Is there something I can do to coax them into spike? — James Tinker

 

A.

In response to short days and cooler temperatures, early winter is generally when phalaenopsis begin to show their spikes in most parts of the country. If your plants are not spiking, it may be the result of insufficient light during the growing season, or the temperatures in the home may be too warm at night. Try providing temperatures in the high 50s into the low 60s for a week or two and see what happens. — Ned Nash





Phalaenopsis intiate inflorescences in response to cool fall nights and shortening day length. Photo © 2009 Greg Allikas


Orchid Q&A

* Masdevallia coccinea
* Mastering Miltonias
* Maxillaria sophronitis
* Mealybug Infestation
* Meristemming Monopodials
* Missing Pollen
* Night Length
* Night Lights
* No Flowers
* Non-flowering Doritaenopsis
* Oncostele Wildcat
* Oncidium Sharry Baby
* Orchid Honeydew
* Paphinia herrerae
* Paphiopedilum armeniacum
* Paphiopedilum delenatii
*
Phaius Culture
* Phalaenopsis Problem
*
Phalaenopsis Spiking
* Plant Sitter
* Psychopsis papilio
* Rainwater Collection
* Redwood Bark
* Re-rooting Plants
* Spotted Oncidum Leaves
*
Sticking Flowers
* Storing Pollen
*
The Larger the Better
* Vanda Keiki
* Virus Question
* Volck Oil Spray